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Last Post 05/29/2008 9:33 PM by  HuskerCat
Training Centers
 11 Replies
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HCofPA
Guest
Guest
Posts:5


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05/24/2008 3:53 PM

    I've read many entries and there are many reasons I have found to not get started in this business.  I am interrested in this business though, but will maintain operating my current contracting company until -or- if being an adjuster can replace my current income.  That being said to establish how I believe that I have an accurate idea of what to expect; low expectectations with the potential of more only IF / WHEN a major storm hits.  My question is regarding a training center in TX.  The contact person is a great salesman, I understand its his job, and he paints a really good picture of potential income.  The many entries I have read here have put that area of his pitch into reality for me.  I know that the reality is a major storm would be needed to start working.  What concerns me is that the only information I have from him is from phone conversations.  There is nothing in writing, which leads me to question the integrity of this company.  Is this standard ops?  Is the desire to fill roster lists that high that they would resort to used car sales methods to fill the seats in training classes?  I have neglected to disclose the name of this company at this point to see what everyone else says. 

    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


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    05/24/2008 4:16 PM

    I still contend after working as an insurance adjuster over 40 years that you will gross about the same amount as a very good hair dresser or automobile brake mechanic that works 16 hours per day, seven days per week and sleeps in their own bed each night.

     

    WILLIS
    Member
    Member
    Posts:97


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    05/25/2008 10:57 AM
    I have been a an adjuster since 1972. There have been good times but not without a price. If you have kids it is a mistake. The job requires too much time away and you only get to see them grow once. If I did it over, I would have worked harder developing local work and been home every night. My wife tells me daily it is worse than being a gypsy. It runs hot and very cold with long dry spells like no major storm in 2 years. A vendor calls wants you on site next day in Oklahoma, or Kansas or Michigan with no guarantee of work you run thinking I will be making lots of money but when you factor all the travel costs, fuel cost, especially now, and then add taxes and that away time that hairdresser job starts looking very profitable. Fuel costs might be the death of this business. Carriers have cut back on schedules and I do not see any making bg fuel adjustments. There will be alot more in house adjusting in the future unless someone figures how to turn this gas issue around and soon.
    okclarryd
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:954


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    05/25/2008 4:30 PM

    Just thinkin' about it , gives me gas

    Larry D Hardin
    moco
    Member
    Member
    Posts:122


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    05/25/2008 6:45 PM

    Made $75,000 last year working day claims, and averaging between 2400-3700 miles a week when busy (inspections span over 2 states). Spent at least $35,000 in motel, gas, fuel and vehicle maint., and still had to pay uncle Sam something. When all is broken down i may have profited $32,500- 33,000. When i first became interested in this all of those i spoke with gladly disclosed (boastfully) on what they made, just did not mention what was spent to make that. Is it worth it anymore? Beginning to wonder, but i work for a vendor who keeps me steady overall and has asked me about the possibility of working salaried. This sounds more beneficial during slow times, but how much will i lose out on when a large storm hits? But i cannot count on a storm hitting every year, as it has already been 2 years. Everyone i know that made large sums in 2005 have damn near spent it all, if not all spent. So if you make $150,000.00 in a good year, but this may have to last you for 3 years that is not much.

    okclarryd
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:954


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    05/25/2008 10:11 PM

    I have been doin' this for a while and have pretty much quit due to some health issues but here's what I have found...................

    I have made a lot more on the myriad and multiple small storms than I ever have on a "named" storm, year in and year out.

    I have made a good living by being capable of going anywhere and working with little or no local supervision.

    I have made a good living by going to Detroit in the winter and south Texas in the summer.

    I have made a good living by being capable, being dependable, being honest, and just by being a pretty good ol' adjuster.

    I have made a good living by working for companies that don't screw around with my money. They understand that my money is also their money and they take very good care of their money.

    I have made a good living by worrying about the claim and not about the billing. The billing will take care of itself.

    The '04 and '05 fiasco made some folks some money and ruined more. They believed the stories about 6 figures year in and year out.

    I have chosen another career path due to some health issues and really miss the cat work.

    I'm just makin' lemonade and enjoying it too
    Larry D Hardin
    RandyC
    Member
    Member
    Posts:197


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    05/26/2008 6:03 PM

    I'm making just a bit less than 2 thousand a week working six and seven ten hour days as an electrician at home. I can be working at double that in two days in Las Vegas or Calif.. I also get annuity, paid insurance, and payment into two different pension plans. We have work as far as the eye can see...without a big storm!

    I spend all my free time networking, certifying, dissecting policy and standing Xactimate on its head. I take days off when I get the chance to ride along with my adjuster friends. It often costs me a double time ten hour day....but I do it.

    I think I know why the vendors don't rush to assign me claims. I'm crazy!

    Randy Cox

    Tom Toll
    Moderator & Life Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:1865


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    05/26/2008 10:05 PM

    Larry and Randy, your both right on. This field of endeavor will never be a get rich quick occupation. In all the years I have been a licensed adjuster, I had one very exceptional year and that was 1992, Hurricane Andrew. Companies were begging for adjusters and were paying very high dollars to get qualified adjusters and particularily General adjusters. I was a GA at the right place and the right time. One of the companies that I was handling claims for gave me a million dollar authority to settle their losses. Never again will that happen. Andrew caught many companies off guard, and as I said, that will never happen again. I met many of you on that storm, which was the plus side of that event.

    If you stay in this business for many years, health issues can surface. Take care of your health and particularily your lungs. Wear a mask or respirator when in unhealthy breathing conditions. Too many non stop hours can cause emotional and eventually heart problems. Listen to your body and obey its commands, or your body will just not be able to take it.

    You can make a decent living at this, but it is getting tougher to do so. Save as much as you can for the dry years and make every moment with your family count for something. Make every moment with your friends and fellow adjusters count for something. You live but one time, make it count.

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


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    05/28/2008 12:49 PM

    Storm work is not for people with small children to raise.

    ecovill
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:14


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    05/28/2008 8:41 PM
    Posted By Ray Hall on 05/28/2008 12:49 PM

    Storm work is not for people with small children to raise.

     

    It is also hard not being able to see the grandchildren!

     

     

    okclarryd
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:954


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    05/29/2008 7:34 PM

    Storm work is not for people with ...................................
    Larry D Hardin
    HuskerCat
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:762


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    05/29/2008 9:33 PM

    That's what I've always liked about you Larry...you never say more than you mea 

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