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Brooks Todd

USA
43 Posts

Posted - 02/17/2004 :  09:09:58  Show Profile
Reply to Jim F:
They teach you to read a policy when you obtain your Texas license
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JimF

USA
1014 Posts

Posted - 02/17/2004 :  10:33:49  Show Profile
Question for Brooks: How many different policies do they teach you to read when you obtain your Texas license and in what kind of time frame?

I have taken one week classes which were taught for just understanding the langauge, meaning and nuances of ONE policy (CGL, BOP, CPP, etc.)

I think that many of the old time adjusters around here such as Tom Toll, Chuck Deaton, John Durham and Jim Lakes can tell you that even after decades of doing this, they are still learning new things about insurance policies and proper interpretation of complex and critical coverage questions.

Obtaining an adjuster's license is not much proof that an adjuster understands all that much of anything about insurance, insurance policies, and claims handling procedures. It's just a license to get into deep and serious trouble for those who may think that the license makes them an adjuster. The license merely lets the Newbee "play" claim rep.

After you have been an adjuster for ten or fifteen years, then come back and pull this post from the CADO archives and tell me I am/was wrong.

Edited by - JimF on 02/17/2004 10:44:31
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danguyer

USA
26 Posts

Posted - 02/17/2004 :  11:05:44  Show Profile
I agree. The only way to learn in this business is by hands on experience. Knowing how to read the policy is one thing, but how to apply the policy to a particular loss is a whole different thing. I've been in this profession for fifteen years and still feel like a rookie at times. Nobody but nobody knows it all!! If you a new in this business, listen to those who can help you and swallow your ego. You'll do fine! Best of luck!!

Dan Guyer
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Kevin Kramer

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  09:19:22  Show Profile
I am an IA based out of Houston Texas with five years as a staff adjuster (exclustvely Catastrophe) who recently pointed my wife and two other friends towards Dearborne to get a Texas Adjusters license. The reports that I received from the three different classes of 40+ students was that they learned just enough to pass the class test, forgot most of what they covered by the time they received their license and were left with feelings of confusion as to what their next step should be. I have a hard time believing that there is any better training than what is being offered as a staff adjuster with a major insurance carrier but at the same time have seen a number of successfull storm claims adjusters who did not take that route. I have learned a great deal in recent months about the latter approach and will gladly share that info w/you. Call me if you would like but make it soon, or at least before the 04 storm season puts me back on the road. K.O. (936) 582-4619
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Johnd

USA
110 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  11:15:47  Show Profile
Brooks Todd
If you are going to depend on what you "learned when you obtained your texas license", then I really feel sorry for your E&O carrier. You do know what E&O is dont you?

John Durham
sui cuique fingunt fortunam
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ChuckDeaton

USA
373 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  13:41:10  Show Profile
We were kids and my father asked my sister, Marilyn, if she knew how to swim. Marilyn said, “yes”. My father said, “Well, jump in there and show us.” Marilyn allowed that even though she knew how she never had actually done any swimming.

Given that the illiteracy rate, in the USA, is 30% and up, it is doubtful that most people can or can be trained to “read” an insurance policy. What do the words, modified by punctuation mean? Endless lawsuits have addressed this.

Just to test your ability, get a copy of the old Texas Homeowners policy and, on your own, determine whether or not mold is covered. Then write up your methodology and write it up and post, free of spelling and grammar error on this board.

Even though roof damage from hail is generally covered, why is it that one slope is covered and an adjacent one not, under an all risk replacement cost policy. Write up your explanation, just like you are going to explain it to an insured and post it here.

Following an other post, what exactly, real world, does your E & O policy cover?
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trader

USA
236 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  16:00:01  Show Profile
E & O is more blood sucked out of the suckers who work for Temp Employment Agencies(vendors, cat adjuster work brokers, who require E & O and Auto liability before and a home state license(if required) If the adjuster brokers will not pay for thier(own) protection why should you. Why would you go to work for a broker who will not advance you $1,000. or more. Why work for a broker who says he will pay you 30 days after he is paid.... I know the an answer... but never again. The only person who will ever sue you is the person you are working for. The companies have always defended me in lawsuits(3or4) in 40 years. Why? If the bullet hits me, it will pass thru and hit the carrier in the frontal lobe.
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KileAnderson

USA
875 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  17:42:51  Show Profile
Chuck, is the other slope not covered because it isn't damaged? If that is the case then I have just answered your question.
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trader

USA
236 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2004 :  22:31:28  Show Profile
Claim adjusters and catastrophe roof climbers are simular in regards most have four good limbs.

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Steve H

Switzerland
30 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2004 :  21:10:08  Show Profile
Those of us who came up the hard way are inclined to think that the same experience can only be gained by doing the same. We have leaned the perils of interpreting policy language, taken statements by hand, worked 60 hrs/wk on salary, hand written $50000 estimates and we think you should, too. It kind of erks us to see you getting off the ski lift when we had to chop down all the trees to hang the thing.

Nevertheless, I have met savvy people from a construction background who made a natural transition to adjusting and I have just been amazed at how well they were able to go forward, even in touchy coverage and reporting situations.

We are in this end of the business partly because the potential rewards are the greatest here. It is ironic that it is both a shortcut for rookies and a goal for old timers. I would rather have a wealth of experience than be flying by the seat of my pants, but I have to acknowledge that some people do that very well. I admire them, both teach and learn from them, and am annoyed by them at the same time. But here we are.
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okclarryd

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2004 :  06:56:54  Show Profile
Kile,

Don't confuse coverage with damage. Whether or not a roof slope is damaged has no bearing on whether or not it may be covered.

One instance that quickly comes to mind on why the adjacent slope is not covered is that the damage to that slope was paid on a previous claim and the slope was not repaired / replaced.

A second instance is the situation where the adjacent slope is on an adjoining property (duplex or condo) and does not belong to the insured.

If the adjacent slope is hailed into mush or burned to a crisp, the damages have no bearing on the coverage. The coverage affords compensation for the damages, if and when it applies.

Maybe.

LARRY D HARDIN
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Brooks Todd

USA
43 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2004 :  00:24:33  Show Profile
John D:
Is E-O erotic orchestration ' or errors & ommisions?
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Brooks Todd

USA
43 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2004 :  00:34:50  Show Profile
Ladies & Germs:
I know there is much to learn, but I also know, having experience in the business means a lot. I have nothing but respect for people who can interpret all the different policies in every state. Texas has the highest deductibles, and in my opinion the most difficult policy to interpret. If you are capable of reading & understanding, and have knowledge of the trades, I do not see why you can't be an effective adjuster.
Please check my spelling
BLT
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okclarryd

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2004 :  07:10:30  Show Profile
Brooks,

I don't know why you can't be an effective adjuster, either. You obviously have the computer skills and have stated you have the trade skills.

So.................

Row your own boat. Do not listen to the naysayers of the world and especially those who inhabit this website.

Since you have the interest and the knowledge, wade in.

See ya on a storm somewhere. Stop by and I'll show ya how to build a macro.

LARRY D HARDIN
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JimF

USA
1014 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2004 :  07:13:36  Show Profile
Brooks, out of curiosity, why would you say that Texas has the most difficult policies to interpret (inferred to mean 'in the US')?

Have you read and interpreted policies from all the other states?

Are you aware that policies in Texas and most other states follow the ISO policy forms and are then modified by state and carriers?

Do you know what the ISO policies look like and how to interpret them?

Which specific policy classes have you attended and/or completed beyond a Texas pre-licensing school?

Having experience in business has nothing to do with one's ability to understand and apply insurance coverages. Having a background in construction can be helpful on the path to becoming and serving as an adjuster, but the woods are full of people with construction backgrounds who were not able to make a success of themselves in adjusting.

Edited by - JimF on 02/28/2004 14:12:51
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