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louis beheler

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2003 :  19:22:05  Show Profile
I recently passed my adjusters course at Dearborn Leonard in Dallas, Texas. My past experience is cellular tower construction for 3 years as a regional project manager, before that I was in Law Enforcement for 12 years. I need a mentor to gain my experience in the cat field. I will do a great job for anybody for providing me with the proper training. Please contact me at 469-233-9887 or email at louisbeheler@yahoo.com. Any consideration would be appreciated.

Louis W. Beheler

Ghostbuster

476 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2003 :  21:19:22  Show Profile
Unbelieveable, just plain unbelieveable...yesterday I couldn't spell adjuster and now I wants ta be one.

Sure go ahead...the concepts of paying ones dues or working oneself up the career ladder or earning the knowledge thru experience are such obsolete concepts that one has to wonder why they were concieved in the first place. Who out there gives a hoot about the Guiding Principals of Insurance or the miracles of a scene canvass? Hey, Clayton! Does anyone take statements anymore with a portable manual typewriter set on the trunk of the company car?

Sure, go ahead and call me a whiney ol' coot. Just don't expect to get any sympathy when you're ambition overloads the reality of our fiduciary functions.
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Glowtom

USA
15 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2003 :  21:25:13  Show Profile
Am I missing something or did someone used your ID? Again, am I missing something?
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CCarr

Canada
1200 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2003 :  23:56:30  Show Profile
My goodness G'man, you sure can make memories of yore come back as vivid pictures; and in technicolor.

Guiding Principals - seemed akin to Einstein's theory, and looked as old, when I was told to read it one night, then when the big fella applied it to a claim the next day and explained it to me; it seemed like the best thing since sliced bread.

I was a pretty prolific statement taker when I was a pup in the early 70's (and that was a big part of the job), but my writing was so bad that the boss kept giving me hell, and Delores - well - Delores, she just plain started to refuse to transcribe them whenever I needed them. They wanted to give me an old IBM - the one before the Selectric - but I took the hint and took my old portable from home that I got for Xmas when I was 14. Everybody thought I was real efficient then, this of course being pre microcassette days.

Anyway, I just don't understand the industry culture anymore, relative to the cat niche. When I was a pup, I heard stories of the 'Stormtrooper' almost in mythical proportions. Then in the 80's when I started to know a few things, I then said that someday I'd like to try that. Even after crossing the fence to that proverbial greener pasture, it was well into the 90's before I said - I think I could do that.

Sure, some walk away from the tar pot and catch the next storm as a 'cat adjuster', and survive. But, I don't see that as the route to take to be a successful cat adjuster and have any longevity at it. There is no more of a singular feeling than leaving the storm office with 70 or 80 new files under your arm, and a mountain of expectations on your shoulders; exhilarating but still quite a burden when you get to your motel room. A person is basically driving blind, without some fundamentals, some training, some experience, through some other venue - whether it be a carrier or day/day IA.

I agree with the "paying of ones dues", but for all concerned - that new cat adjuster with 50 files, those insureds, the vendor, and the carrier - it is a disaster waiting to happen - without a measure of reality as to what the fundamentals of insurance are, training in the communication aspects of all those that an adjuster will encounter, and prior field experience to see the fundamentals applied and that would give some logic to the theory.

I just don't see success - for all concerned - happening any other way. I just don't see what the attraction is for a new person with 50 files to head back to their motel room and suddenly be alone with no guidance or self-direction, or no training or no experience.

I don't think that happens in any other industry with a trainee or junior person. I'm sure a carrier does not thrust a trainee staff adjuster into the real world alone like that; and I'm reasonably sure that a day/day IA vendor would not put that burden on a trainee IA.

Why do we - ourselves, the vendors, and the carriers condone or tolerate it, in the cat niche?
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Amber

USA
23 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2003 :  07:57:44  Show Profile
Guys.... While I do understand where you're coming from.... Louis isn't asking to be thrown out there with files all alone. He's asking to work under someone in order to learn the ropes. Most of us don't prefer to be a hands on adjusting mentor; but, there are some out there who don't mind doing it. I hope the day never comes that I've been working this career of mine for so long that I forget I, like everyone else, had to start from ground zero. Don't shoot me.... Just sharing my penny's worth of thoughts. Louis: There are other adjusting avenues you can go through to gain much needed knowledge and experience before jumping directly into the cat world. I think one of the best routes to get your feet wet is to work in an office. You will get hands on learning of policy guidelines. You will learn firsthand what makes a good or bad report/claim file among many other things.

Edited by - Amber on 12/18/2003 08:01:10
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Russ

USA
75 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2003 :  08:26:06  Show Profile
Louis,

I would try to go to as many trade shows as I could. There are many Adjusting firms and other Adjusters that attend as well. Its called networking and I think it is important to get out there and meet the people that hire us!! I always attend the Wind Conference, because it is a local event for me and always a great experience, although this year it is in New Orleans. There are many others NACA, Worleys, Brush Country, ETC. Roy always puts them on the CADO calender. Good luck!
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goose

57 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2003 :  11:21:16  Show Profile
This is a quote from Louis's post: "I need a mentor to gain my experience in the cat field. I will do a great job for anybody for providing me with the proper training." Where does he say that he wants 50 files? Looks to me like he wants to be trained properly and is not asking for money to learn it. Which is exactly how most of us started. In fact, some of us paid adjusters to learn it, others worked for free well after the time we were no longer an expense and were actually able to help make our mentor some money. If a person is willing to work his/her tail off, keeps a good attitude and keeps knocking on doors, there is eventual steady employment out there. Good luck. If you are still available come hail season, you will get some calls, IF you make it happen. Amber's advice to work in an office is one I often wished I had taken when I was first starting out.
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randy1120

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2004 :  19:16:53  Show Profile
WOW is the adjusting buisiness this cut throat? You guys are brutal! I am in the exact same position as louis,just took the Dearborn course and am trying to get into this new "career" of adjusting. I have spent the past 27 years in construction, not in the management end but in the hands on end. I bet I been on almost as many roofs as most of you guys but I wasn't up there taking pictures I was up there building the roof. I wish I had a nickel for every young pup that I took under my wing on a big jobsite and made sure he knew what he was doing, not just so he could be better at his job, but to make sure he knew how to do his job. Now i am going to be the pup in the adjusting buisiness and i hope i can find some one to show me the ropes. What they don't tell you at the Dearborn school is that most big companies require that you have a 4 year college degree before they will even let you apply. If anyone out there wants to show me this adjusting buisiness I will show them how to lay out and cut a 14 stair stringer or 6/12 common rafter. thanks randy1120
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khromas

USA
103 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2004 :  22:51:17  Show Profile
I will be returning to the Newport News/Williamsburg/Norfolk area January 5th to work regular business for a local vendor. Spent 5 weeks up there last October/November and the vendor offered me a full-time position. Considering that it was 75^ here in Houston today (Friday 1-2) I'm am going to spend Jan and Feb there to see if I can take the winters!

If you are new to the business, I would not hesitate to have you ride with me on some claims and to share with you my approach to handling claims from both the professional side (estimates, paperwork, file assembly, etc.) and from the customer service side.(Over the last 6 months I was with Allstate, I received over 50 complimentary letters from insureds on claims I handled.) Organization and professionalism go a long way toward credibility. During my 7 years with Allstate, I managed some smaller cats from the inside so I have a good feel for what the carriers look for from independents. That makes it a whole lot easier when you start working from the outside as an IA!

I can be reached at 713-416-8044 (cellphone) all day Saturday 1/3 & Sunday 1/4 while I am on the road driving up there and that number will reach me while in Virginia as well.

Kevin Hromas
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Brooks Todd

USA
43 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2004 :  12:26:26  Show Profile
Randy: You are right, some of these guys think they know everything. I have 22 years in the business, started as a framer, but can't compete with the cheap labor now. I can assure you that you can spot hail damage, climb the roofs, and measure better than most existing adjusters, because of your hands on experience. Of all the trades, once you learn to frame, you have learned the hardest skill.
Brooks
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JimF

USA
1014 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2004 :  14:02:11  Show Profile
Brooks, just out of curiosity, do they teach in depth insurance policy and claims procedures in roofing and framing classes?
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Tom Toll

USA
154 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2004 :  14:36:42  Show Profile
When I started with Farm Bureau in 1961, I had a one week indoctrination, was shown how to write a check, and how to fill out an expense voucher. Did I know anything about insurance, NO. My mentor was the late Gerald Meacham, who was the claims manager. I burned the telephone line up talking to him about claims. They sent me to Farm Bureau Tech 6 weeks after I had started to learn policy. Most of my training was based on blood and guts. I made mistakes, as we all do, but learned from everyone that I made. I learned policy, basically on my own, as I enjoyed the profession. They sent me to law school, Kennedy's school of Arson investigaton, and many more schools, including Dale Carnegie.

I have mentored a number of young adjusters and they are doing well. I will, one day, go into total retirement, as will many of the ol' timers on this web site. I would retire better if I knew we had dedicated and educated young adjusters out there. Ghost is right, the school of hard knocks seems to be the beast of the past, but it should not be. You don't learn this business without getting bruises.

Edited by - Tom Toll on 01/05/2004 14:37:37
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CCarr

Canada
1200 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2004 :  15:47:58  Show Profile
I think we established a couple of weeks ago in another thread - around the time of my 12/17 post to this thread - that indepth insurance policy and claims procedures were not needed for the "inspect and estimate" crowd.

Although it is not the way I was weaned, nor can I support it today, but I am resigned to the fact that these roofer boys will likely do as well as most of the crowd who accept the "inspect and estimate" assignments.
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Stormkat

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2004 :  02:21:31  Show Profile
It is absolutely embarrasing to read how so called "seasoned adjusters" mock such innocence as that of Louis. How quickly one forgets that at some point in time they too were new and trying to break into the business. Why is it that you critical ones always condemn the newbie for their poor performance when the critical eye needs to be focused on the company that put them to work without proper training and supervision. It takes courage and guts to go out into a field of the unknown and try to figure the business out by trial and error without help and being under such condemnation as you have shown to all of us.

Louis, you will do well and someone who has a true adjuster's mentality of helping will step up to the plate and be the mentor you need. Don't be intimidated by those who are so quick to use their mouth as a means to elevate themselves as adjuster Gods!
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deleted

USA
53 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2004 :  09:44:06  Show Profile
Louis,
Be careful of what offers you accept...I've been ripped off...Khromas can be trusted...Stormkat, whoever you are...there are people on this board who aren't what they appear to me, for all we know you could be one of those types...if you are on the up and up then you'd know better than to have this young man rush into something he still doesn't understand...it's very easy to get ripped off on a storm...
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ChuckDeaton

USA
373 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2004 :  12:29:00  Show Profile
Cat 102 was and remains free. Want advise email me and ask for Cat 102.
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