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Last Post 08/01/2010 8:06 PM by  BeauKron
Training School Wars and Integrity
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JimAustin
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07/22/2010 12:29 PM
    So many posts i read on this forum are about certain schools being dishonest and how you shouldn't attend their classes or how one company is so much better than the other.  Some very seasoned and experienced adjusters have posted several replies on this site that in my opinion they should be ashamed of.  Where has the honor gone in our industry?  Each and every one of you that are professional bloggers on this site.  Take a good look in the mirror and ask yourselves if maybe you've just become a bitter old man/woman or if you truly have something positive to contribute to this site. Affiliations aside (which I have none) adjusters for the most part use this site for support, getting answers to important questions and determining how best to break into the industry.  Can we all strive to make this a better forum.  If you have actually attended a specific school and have an opinion on your experience, then you should share that experience, however; tell the truth, be ethical and have honor.  If you haven't attended the school and are spouting off nonsense about their practices and curriculum, then you just come off as being bitter and truly look like you have nothing better to do than get on this site and complain about anything and everything you can think of.
     

    Below is a exert from a Large Insurance Carriers ethics training.  I suggest that everyone read and try to practice this to the best of their ability.  Heres hoping for a better site and a successful year for all Cat Adjusters.
     
     
     

    ž  “Always do the right thing.”

    ž  If only it were that simple. But ethical business conduct is not always cut and dried. It can be extremely difficult to determine the best course of action when you have more than one option. And something might be legal but still not the right thing to do. When you run into a situation where the best decision isn’t clear, test your potential decisions by asking the following questions:

    ž   Is it legal?

    ž   Could my action give the impression or be interpreted as being inappropriate or unethical?

    ž  Would I be proud to tell my spouse, parents, children or trusted friends about my action?

    ž  Would I like to see this action published on the front page of our local newspaper?

    ž  The Ethics Code of Conduct requires us to meet competitive challenges fairly and in ways that maintain our reputation for honesty and fair dealing. If you are unsure of what to do, seek clarification and guidance before you act.

     
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    cgragg
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    07/22/2010 5:54 PM
    Jim, maybe you and your friends should read what you posted for us. You are the ones that seem so bitter ready to attack if anyone says something you dislike. You can't threaten, intimidate, and bully anyone who disagrees or questions a matter. You all were so nasty to me. Your boss lady called me huffing and puffing stating that if she hjas to call Nationwide telling them that I had concerns about daily vs. cat certifications, then I wouldn't ever have a chance to work for Nationwide. HOW DOES THIS SOUND TO YOU? Maybe this is everyday business to you but not to me.

    I've only taken your certification classes, so I can't speak of your training facility. However, with the outlandish conduct your company has displayed towards me and this blog, I wouldn't recommend a frog take your classes.

    Everyone has the right to express their opinion and experiences. Again, if you don't like what you read, then don't participate.

    P. S. I must say that I"m happy your attorney didn't send me emails today threatening to sue me.



    ****************STAND TALL AGAINST BULLYING************************
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    creede7
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    07/22/2010 6:11 PM
    Kudos to you JAustin. We, as an industry, appreciate your professional and upmost ethical approach and demeanor.
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    JimAustin
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    Posts:14


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    07/23/2010 9:16 AM
    cgragg,

    why are you referring to me as my school and my friends and my classes?

    I live in Nevada.
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    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
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    Posts:2443


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    07/23/2010 11:44 AM
    Would a vendor that has two billing schedules be honoraby, would a vendor who gives a person who has never work a claim 25-30 claims, let that mullet make 100 phone calls to stop the phones from ringing, takes the files back and lets the inside crooks write them up and bill them. When many adjusters nude the scope upwards to hit the next brackett, when many adjusters on cats, own a water sucker biz back home and swing with local water suckers. When adjusters turn roofers when the files stop and tag team with their pal on the closed files. I could go on and one. I know many adjusters  are not not like his, but this % is much higher than we would think. Come on Austin I have heard the training school pitch,s and I sounds like you may be connected with a school.
     
    Some one post  the officers and directors names of these honorable schools, and the states of incorporation . Let the sun shine in.
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    jdacree
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    Posts:161


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    07/24/2010 9:29 PM
    Speaking for the new adjusters, I have to thank Jim for his above post.  In these forums there has been a wealth of "GOOD" information for the new adjuster, and for the experienced adjuster both.  In my year of posting and reading, I can fairly say that I have gained a wealth of knowledge, BUT had to sort through a ton of junk and abuse to get that information. 
     
     Most of the detrimential (sp?) comment have been directed to the new people asking questions and trying to gain information.  Many of these questions seem "dumb", until we stop to realize that in the gaining of experience there really is no dumb question, until that question has been asked by the same person a number of times.  I have been fortunate in my experiences, that when I asked a dumb question and the tirade started about all the newbies, someone would address the question, either in the forum or by personal contact.
     
    This web site is designed to be an adjuster to adjuster information center.  An information center is supposed to supply information to anyone asking for it.  For the few that seem to take delight in chastizing everything a new person asks, or wants to deride everything presented, well maybe we need a seperate login where experienced adjusters only can communicate and share thier experiences.
    Jim Acree Stupidity is the art of not trying to learn Ignorance is the lack of opportunity to learn I am ignorant
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    claims_ray
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    Posts:293


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    07/25/2010 6:59 AM
    Jdacree, you are correct concerning the uses for this forum however remember that some teach differently than others and you can't dictate how a person chooses to deliver their lesson. You can only choose how you react and/or respond to their lesson.
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    Joe60
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    07/25/2010 9:43 AM
    Claims_ray,
      That is probably the most helpful post I have ever seen, if one truly understands its meaning.
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    Ray Hall
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    Posts:2443


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    07/25/2010 2:13 PM
    If you are a Texas resident you may train under a person that has a TX. license for one year. This is a very old law for fathers or close kin passing down the lnowledge down toProbably the next generation. I know some very good adjusters who never worked for an insurance carrier that were trained by their fathers.  Probably one of the most respected IA adjusters in Houston, TX got a CPCU designation in college and then took over the family business.
     
    The "truck adjuster" with the best reputation in Texas was also trained by his father, and the stories are repleat with "go read up on this and then come back" and I will show you or tell you if any short cuts can be taken.
     
    The best way to learn this biz, is to have a "daddy" or a 4 year degree, get on with a large insurance company and let them train you for 5 years. I have seen hundreds of catastrophe adjusters with this background and they do very well after leaving the staff ranks, but not more than a bakers dozen have made the other way (license and training schools). I think at least two of the Pilot boys had some company experience, and I know all of them had years of college.
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    ChuckDeaton
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    Posts:1110


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    07/25/2010 4:41 PM
    Virtually any school is set up to benefit the owner. The benefit comes through the fees charged. Obviously the school that has the best reputation for teaching subjects taht put people to work is going to have the largest gross.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    Ray Hall
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    Posts:2443


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    07/25/2010 9:51 PM
    I have some experience in training schools. I spent about 3 weeks of my life giving free classes and found out a profit school would be like stealing money from people; BECAUSE 40 to 80 hours of training is almost a waste of time; UNLESS the person goes out that same week and brings the product back to you to work out all the kinks etc. I have said many times on this forum it takes about 5 years are 10,000 hours of OJT and I will never change my mind. I think it will take at least 100 files that have been submitted and rejected several times for a new person to get their feet underneath them. Tis will be about 600 to 1,000 hours and the new person will be about 1/5 the way to the goal post. I have been very vocal on this subject and I would like to hear from one living person who has made a living with 3 or 4 three day classes. I would welcome some person who has been to these rip off,s to give me the story to tell on this site. You will be anonymous as well as the schools. I have seen some material from an individual that he passes out and he can teach you a lot in 5 days, but you need to go direct to a storm to practice.
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    BeauKron
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    07/31/2010 12:33 PM
    There are some great points in the thread about learning to become an adjuster.

    It seems there are two schools of thought battling it out here:
    1- A training school is the way to get started.
    2- Being mentored is the way to get started.

    It seems silly to think that one can learn adjusting in just a few days, but it is hard to find a mentor (helpers don't usually speed things up.)

    Any other suggestions?
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    Ray Hall
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    Posts:2443


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    08/01/2010 11:24 AM
    You can do  alot by self study, purchase a college text book on property & casualty Insurance, practice estimation on your own house. Go to building supply stores and see what goes into a house, get a book on framing measure all your friends roofs the tape measure way. Contact me
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    CGibbs31
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    08/01/2010 11:42 AM
    I'm a new adjuster who attended training classes to gain my Texas license and some certs. I first went to US Staffing where I completed three of their courses and an assesssment testing. I also went to Worley's annual convention to network and gained a earthquake certification. I found both to be very beneficial.

    I agree that you aren't going to become a great adjuster by attending a number of 3 to 5 day classes. I also agree that the best way to learn is to be on a storm site and actually scoping losses. I have learned more in the two storms that I've been deployed on so far this year with US Staffing than I could have learned in a year of classes. There is no substitute for the real thing.

    Fact is though, taking those classes gave me an example of what life as an adjuster may look like and I gained contacts that allowed me to get my foot in the door of this very competitive industry. But you can't just attend a class and assume you will have work. It merely begins by taking the class then you need to persue deployment.

    I realize that two deployments does not make me a "successful adjuster". But my success as an adjuster is a much more attainable goal today than last year at this time and in large part has been made possible because I started by taking training classes at US Staffing. I am looking forward to my next deployment with them as well.
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    ChuckDeaton
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    Posts:1110


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    08/01/2010 3:38 PM
    I will help you. Using Skype I will conduct conference calls and answer your questions. My Skype name is Dolittle52. I will invite Ray Hall, Ol Ghost, Tom Toll and Charles Lollar to participate. Experienced, successful adjusters, all.

    This is not a free offer.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    ChuckDeaton
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    08/01/2010 3:47 PM
    I can't guarantee work, but I can help you get started and coach you as you move forward. I do guarantee that you will learn something that is worth the money spent.
     
    Talking to a bunch of experienced adjusters will reduce the risk and increase the net.
     
    Find out how we do it.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    BeauKron
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    08/01/2010 8:06 PM
    Ray,
    I'll give you a call. Thanks!

    Chuck,
    I appreciate your offer, and anyone trying to get started would be silly not to take you up on it.
    With only 11 years as an adjuster, I freely admit I don't know everything despite handling auto, residential and commercial losses as an adjuster, file reviewer and team lead.

    I'd love to talk sometime if you're up to it; I enjoy learning from veteran adjusters.

    We all have different experiences; that's part of what makes the job great- one can never know it all!

    Surely there are more suggestions for the new guys.
    Schools alone don't get you there.
    It is tough to get a mentor.

    Ray's suggested self-study of college Property and Casualty textbooks as well as practicing estimatics at home.
    Chuck's suggested conference calling with some veterans.
    Both solid advice.

    It is one thing to get deployed; it is another altogether to be prepared.
    Without proper preparation, a rookie can expect to have claims pulled after 7-10 days if they're not up to snuff.

    What other methods would you suggest to a new adjuster to help get started?
    How else to be prepared for deployment?


    ~Beau

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