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Catastrophe Central, Discuss, Share, Learn

What's the best way to protect your rope over the ridge
Last Post 06/24/2014 10:29 AM by pondman. 18 Replies.
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nateking82
Guest
Guest
Posts:1


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03/07/2012 6:24 PM

    I just recently got all of the equipment needed for my rope and harness. I've been acquainting myself with it on my roof since its not too steep (7/12) and feel confident in my abilities using it. After a few uses I can tell that the shingles are wearing into my rope and the rope is digging into my ridge pretty well too. My question is, what's the best way to protect your rope over the ridge? 

    I've done my due dilligents in trying to figure this out on my own. I've read several of the other forums that talk about rope and harness and they've been extremely informative. However, there's not a whole lot of mention about how some of y'all go about protecting your rope over the ridge. There's been mention of using a garden hose and the foam pipe insulation (don't think this would last very long) and possibly some other methods that I can't remember off hand. When I bought my equipment I asked the guy there how to protect the rope and he said that, when rock climbing, they would use their rope bag. Has anyone tried this with with their bag or even a piece of tarp before? Just trying to figure out what others use for this because I really dont want have to keep buying new ropes all the time. 

    The rope I use is a Sterling 11mm static.

    Thanks in advance.

    Nate


    mcgrawreed
    Member
    Member
    Posts:47


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    03/14/2012 7:53 AM
    During my rappelling days we used a piece of carpet between the rope and the rock to protect the rappel line and that seemed to work better than a piece of hose or tarp. I don't use rope and harness as I feel it is an unnecessary burden. But I am curious as to how you attach the line to an anchor and how you get the line over the roof. I've heard various answers and would like to know your preferred method.
    Steve McGraw Professional Adjuster
    nateking82
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:1


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    03/16/2012 11:41 AM

    Thanks Steve, I'll try a small piece of carpet next time.  It can be a burden with having to set it all up sometimes, but on a two story home that's a little steep it makes all the difference to me.  As far as the anchor point I use webbing around whatever I see fit (tree, fence post, column) and I use a couple carabiners to attach the rope.  For getting the rope over I use a weighted tethered tennis ball (a dog toy) tied to a 2mm rope.  At first I tried, what I'm calling, The Underhand Slingshot Method - David and Goliath style, that didn't work too well since my aim isn't that great.  I went back to the pet store and found a tennis ball thrower.  It looks similar to a clay target thrower if you were skeet shooting.  I like using this, my aim is way better and its pretty easy to use.  It's certainly a lot cheaper than other methods and doesn't take up any space in my truck.

    ChuckDeaton
    Life Member
    Posts:1110


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    03/16/2012 3:46 PM
    Try a fishing rod with a super ball in a net bag.

    Climb to the top of your ladder and cast it over the ridge.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
    CatAdjusterX
    Posts:964


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    03/16/2012 7:32 PM

    Posted By ChuckDeaton on 16 Mar 2012 03:46 PM
    Try a fishing rod with a super ball in a net bag.

    Climb to the top of your ladder and cast it over the ridge.

    Whilst I have never used any type of a "fall arrest system", it would seem that whatever it is that you utilize in protecting your line from being frayed and therefore weakened by the ridgeline would also have to pull double duty in protecting the ridgeline from further damage 

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
    Mark Dorschug
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:1


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    05/03/2012 10:51 PM
    I use a 2' long scrap piece of 3" fire hose that I got from my local fire department and run my rope thru it. Check with a locall fire department, I bet they have a couple hundred feet of it laying around.
    AcceleratedAdjuster
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:153


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    06/14/2012 10:02 AM

    Most sporting goods supply stores that retail ropes and harnesses also sell a wide nylon sleeve that protects your rope and the ridge (designed for rock climbing, but it is functional). They are usually about 3' in length, and the only hassle associated with them is sliding them along the rope as you climb. The huge benefit to these is that if your rope moves along the ridge while you are lower down the slope, the sleeve rides the ridge, protecting both the shingles and your ropes.

    www.acceleratedadjusting.com
    ChuckDeaton
    Life Member
    Posts:1110


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    06/14/2012 9:10 PM
    Never made any effort to protect my rope, should it become frayed it's back to Home Depot for more rope. As a veteran I get the 10% discount.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
    okclarryd
    Posts:954


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    06/20/2012 8:50 PM
    I keep my rope in top shape by leaving it rolled up in the shed.

    Happy Trails
    Larry D Hardin
    Tim_Johnson
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:243


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    06/21/2012 7:48 PM
    Hey Larry, you ever stop by the paulor these days?
    Tim Johnson
    okclarryd
    Posts:954


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    06/22/2012 10:18 PM
    I stop by every day to pick up the money, wash the towels, etc. We've given up on trying to wash the sheets, we just replace 'em.
    Larry D Hardin
    Tim_Johnson
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:243


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    07/01/2012 8:47 PM
    At the paulor. do they keep their ropes rolled up in the shed?
    Tim Johnson
    okclarryd
    Posts:954


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    07/08/2012 8:51 PM
    Nope

    Each room has their own, hanging on a peg by the door right next to the handcuffs and foot restraints.
    Larry D Hardin
    Linda
    Life Member
    Member
    Member
    Posts:31


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    07/16/2012 11:30 AM
    During R/H certification with State Farm I learned a high tech way of protecting the rope and the ridge at the same time.  Use a piece of pipe insulation and wrap it on with duct tape covering the entire length of the insulation.  The insulation protects and the duct tape allows it to slide across the ridge with no drag or damage to the rope or the roofing.
    Catsvstrained
    Member
    Member
    Posts:55


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    09/20/2012 3:02 PM

    Kernmantle rope is very abrasive, tends to wear out garden hose, pvc and insulation pipe quickly.Carpet pad works relatively well however, most of the damage to the ridgecap and rope happens when the rope is pulled into place over the roofing structure.  Might want to take a look at this product:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sWFyRPCOXM

    It can be put in place from the ground by loading it onto your rope behind your Rope Caddy. If your still not convinced then come out to my place and I will show you myself.

     

    CatSvs Trained
    claims_ray
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:293


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    09/20/2012 8:25 PM
    Looks like an excellent pivot point which appears to address both the damage that could occur to the rope and the ridge.
    Catsvstrained
    Member
    Member
    Posts:55


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    02/22/2013 8:36 AM
    Well, it is the way that the forensic engineers at Haag, Rimkus & Donan get a rope in place w/o causing damage to the ridge cap so it should be good enough for the average adjuster.
    CatSvs Trained
    Catsvstrained
    Member
    Member
    Posts:55


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    06/22/2014 8:59 AM

    Better Video of Getting A Rope Over A Roof:

     

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raNEQC9kT2w

    CatSvs Trained
    pondman
    Member
    Member
    Posts:88


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    06/24/2014 10:29 AM

    Nice info commercial. What gets me with seeing something like this is it doesn't have the correct field condition that we face so we can see "actual true" field working conditions and how a product “actually” works. Nice RIDGE CAP, very smooth to allow rope to glide and slide right across. (We are not even talking about the tag line here either. It’s the one that you have problems with getting caught between ridge cap tabs). It would be nice to have that condition when deploying my rope over a 12/12 two story high with a full basement instead of high profile cap over Cobra vent. 

    What you have works fine, but instead of the PVC pipe you could also use the top cut off of a plastic “coke soft drink” liter bottle to keep climbing rope and knot (not tag line) from getting caught. Cost = $1.29 and you get a cold drink to boot.

    Also, no one has “ever” addressed how you get the suede/leather protector “exactly” in the right place on your 250-300 ft. rope where it will be directly over ridge at deployment from 2 stories below. I will buy that product right now if you explain, because the pivot point is a great idea for steep and tall hip inspections.

    Look forward to hearing more.

    Give them what they want, when they want it, and how they want it !
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


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