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Last Post 07/30/2014 8:41 PM by  host
National Independent Adjuster Licensing Regulation Slowly Progressing
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rwheeling
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07/12/2014 9:51 PM
    Though the NAIC adopted the Public Adjuster Licensing Model Act in 2005, only six states have adopted the national model. According to Nordman, three of the six states – Illinois, North Carolina and Virginia – added their own legislation in addition to adopting the model. Meanwhile, 47 jurisdictions (which include U.S. states and territories and the District of Columbia) do not adhere to the model but have addressed public adjuster licensing with their own requirements. Read more at: http://www.claimsjournal.com/news/n...ent-873524

    There do seem to be some progress made by NAIC on Spring Meeting 2014. According to “NAIC Report: 2014 Spring National Meeting”, a consistent theme at the Spring National Meeting was that the NAIC’s work needs to proceed smoothly and efficiently in order to present the best defense of the state-based system of insurance regulation against encroachment by federal regulators. The NAIC has also taken actions to make the organization more transparent. The industry will doubtless appreciate all movements towards transparency at the NAIC, as well as support related measures that can only enhance the credibility of the NAIC in the eyes of the world. I believe all these measures taken by NAIC will help National Independent Adjuster Licensing Regulation to progress faster.
    We are committed to helping Catastrophe Adjusters in the field be more organized, efficient and productive. http://www.scheduleit.org/ Call today at 515-44 CLAIM
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


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    07/22/2014 9:27 AM

    The National Independent Adjuster Licensing comes from a H.R. Bill titled the CLAIM Act that was introduced in September of 2012 information on this bill was posted on the Licensing page and is currently tracked on that page.   The current status of that bill (H.R. 6415 (112th): CLAIM Act) is listed as "died" by govtrack.gov.  However, the bill was reintroduced in May of 2013 and the current status of the reintroduced bill is "Referred to Committee" and per Govtrack.gov the prognosis is that it has a 4% chance of being enacted.  The bill is: "To encourage uniformity and reciprocity among States that license insurance claims adjusters and to facilitate prompt and efficient adjusting of insurance claims in the case of natural and other disasters and losses, and for other purposes."

    You can click here to read the full text of the bill. 

    rwheeling
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    Guest
    Posts:23


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    07/23/2014 3:51 AM

    Thanks Roy for the additional information!  It is not surprising to me that these changes or "suggestions" for change are always near the time of larger scale catastrophe events.  We will continue to evaluate the progression (if there is any) and see where it leads!

     

     

    We are committed to helping Catastrophe Adjusters in the field be more organized, efficient and productive. http://www.scheduleit.org/ Call today at 515-44 CLAIM
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


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    07/30/2014 8:41 PM

    Here are some comments from an article on PropertyCasualty360.com that I believe to be related to a national adjuster license.

     

    "Adjuster License Confusion

    One problem in discussing adjuster licenses is that it would require an entire textbook to explain all the variations on state rules. For states requiring a license, it may be just a revenue factor. Pay your fee every two years and you’re in. (Georgia, North Carolina, New Mexico and West Virginia licenses are only for one year.) Others have established a massive list of requirements, from exams or years of supervised experience to required continuing education. There are different licenses for company adjusters than for independent adjusters, and different licenses for claims administration representatives, depending on what type of claims they handle, and still different licenses for public adjusters. Those handling National Flood Insurance Program claims have yet other rules.

    The National Association of Insurance Commissioners has a suggested model licensing law, but few states use it, preferring to let the politicians in the state legislature make their own rules. And where rules get complicated is in the area of reciprocity: some states allow just about any licensed adjuster in, while others quibble over accepting certain designated home state criteria. In some, filing is electronic, in others a paper application suffices. What is true today may change tomorrow. In short, one size does not fit all."

    Credit: The comments above come from an titled "Adjuster Licensing and Professionalism" posted on  PropertyCasualty360.com 7/30/2014 click here to read the article.


     

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